Directed Dispersal: Demographic Analysis of an Ant-Seed Mutualism

@article{Hanzawa1988DirectedDD,
  title={Directed Dispersal: Demographic Analysis of an Ant-Seed Mutualism},
  author={Frances M. Hanzawa and Andrew James Beattie and David C. Culver},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1988},
  volume={131},
  pages={1 - 13}
}
Certain seed dispersers may benefit plants by depositing seeds in specific microsites favorable for survival or growth. This has been called "directed dispersal." We examine the effects of seed dispersal by ants on the demography of two seed cohorts of Corydalis aurea: one relocated to ant nests by undisturbed ant foragers, and a control cohort of equal numbers planted by hand in the vicinity of each nest. The ant-treated cohort produced 90% more offspring than the control cohort and had a… 

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