Direct production of mouse disease models by embryo microinjection of TALENs and oligodeoxynucleotides.

Abstract

The study of genetic disease mechanisms relies mostly on targeted mouse mutants that are derived from engineered embryonic stem (ES) cells. Nevertheless, the establishment of mutant ES cells is laborious and time-consuming, restricting the study of the increasing number of human disease mutations discovered by high-throughput genomic analysis. Here, we present an advanced approach for the production of mouse disease models by microinjection of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides into one-cell embryos. Within 2 d of embryo injection, we created and corrected chocolate missense mutations in the small GTPase RAB38; a regulator of intracellular vesicle trafficking and phenotypic model of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Because ES cell cultures and targeting vectors are not required, this technology enables instant germline modifications, making heterozygous mutants available within 18 wk. The key features of direct mutagenesis by TALENs and oligodeoxynucleotides, minimal effort and high speed, catalyze the generation of future in vivo models for the study of human disease mechanisms and interventions.

DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1218721110

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@article{Wefers2013DirectPO, title={Direct production of mouse disease models by embryo microinjection of TALENs and oligodeoxynucleotides.}, author={Benedikt Wefers and Melanie Meyer and Oskar Ortiz and Martin Hrabě de Angelis and Jens Hansen and Wolfgang Wurst and Ralf K{\"{u}hn}, journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America}, year={2013}, volume={110 10}, pages={3782-7} }