Direct measurement of the transfer rate of chloroplast DNA into the nucleus

@article{Huang2003DirectMO,
  title={Direct measurement of the transfer rate of chloroplast DNA into the nucleus},
  author={Chun-Yuan Huang and Michael Ayliffe and Jeremy N. Timmis},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2003},
  volume={422},
  pages={72-76}
}
Gene transfer from the chloroplast to the nucleus has occurred over evolutionary time. [] Key Method A screen for kanamycin-resistant seedlings was conducted with about 250,000 progeny produced by fertilization of wild-type females with pollen from plants containing cp-neoSTLS2. Sixteen plants of independent origin were identified and their progenies showed stable inheritance of neoSTLS2, characteristic of nuclear genes. Thus, we provide a quantitative estimate of one transposition event in about 16,000…

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