Direct evidence of extensive diversity of HIV-1 in Kinshasa by 1960

@article{Worobey2008DirectEO,
  title={Direct evidence of extensive diversity of HIV-1 in Kinshasa by 1960},
  author={Michael Worobey and Marlea Gemmel and Dirk E Teuwen and Tamara S. Haselkorn and Kevin J. Kunstman and Michael Bunce and Jean Jacques Muyembe and Jean-Marie M. Kabongo and Raphael Mbona Kalengayi and Eric A. Van Marck and Marcus Thomas Pius Gilbert and Steven Wolinsky},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2008},
  volume={455},
  pages={661-664}
}
Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) sequences that pre-date the recognition of AIDS are critical to defining the time of origin and the timescale of virus evolution. A viral sequence from 1959 (ZR59) is the oldest known HIV-1 infection. Other historically documented sequences, important calibration points to convert evolutionary distance into time, are lacking, however; ZR59 is the only one sampled before 1976. Here we report the amplification and characterization of viral sequences… 
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TLDR
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