Direct and indirect aggression during childhood and adolescence: a meta-analytic review of gender differences, intercorrelations, and relations to maladjustment.

@article{Card2008DirectAI,
  title={Direct and indirect aggression during childhood and adolescence: a meta-analytic review of gender differences, intercorrelations, and relations to maladjustment.},
  author={Noel A. Card and Brian Dale Stucky and Gita Murli Sawalani and Todd D. Little},
  journal={Child development},
  year={2008},
  volume={79 5},
  pages={
          1185-229
        }
}
This meta-analytic review of 148 studies on child and adolescent direct and indirect aggression examined the magnitude of gender differences, intercorrelations between forms, and associations with maladjustment. Results confirmed prior findings of gender differences (favoring boys) in direct aggression and trivial gender differences in indirect aggression. Results also indicated a substantial intercorrelation (r = .76) between these forms. Despite this high intercorrelation, the 2 forms showed… 

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