Dipole Anisotropy in the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers First-Year Sky Maps

@article{Kogut1993DipoleAI,
  title={Dipole Anisotropy in the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers First-Year Sky Maps},
  author={Alan Kogut and C. Lineweaver and George F. Smoot and Charles L. Bennett and Anthony J. Banday and Nancy W. Boggess and Edward S. Cheng and Giovanni De Amici and Dale J. Fixsen and Gary F. Hinshaw and Peter Douglas Jackson and Michael A. Janssen and Phillip B. Keegstra and Kurt L{\"o}wenstein and Philip Lubin and John C. Mather and L. Tenorio and Rainer Weiss and David Todd Wilkinson and Edward L. Wright},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal},
  year={1993},
  volume={419},
  pages={1-6}
}
We present a determination of the cosmic microwave background dipole amplitude and direction from the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) first year of data. Data from the six DMR channels are consistent with a Doppler-shifted Planck function of dipole amplitude ΔT=3.365±0.027 mK toward direction (l II , b II )=(264°.4±0°.3, 48°.4±0°.5). The implied velocity of the Local Group with respect to the CMB rest frame is v LG =627±22 km s −1 toward (l II , b II )=(276°±3°, 30°±3°). DMR has… 
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