Dioxins, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and the central regulation of energy balance

@article{Lindn2010DioxinsTA,
  title={Dioxins, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and the central regulation of energy balance},
  author={Jere Lind{\'e}n and Sanna Lensu and Jouko Tuomisto and Raimo Pohjanvirta},
  journal={Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology},
  year={2010},
  volume={31},
  pages={452-478}
}
Dioxins are ubiquitous environmental contaminants that have attracted toxicological interest not only for the potential risk they pose to human health but also because of their unique mechanism of action. This mechanism involves a specific, phylogenetically old intracellular receptor (the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, AHR) which has recently proven to have an integral regulatory role in a number of physiological processes, but whose endogenous ligand is still elusive. A major acute impact of… 
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Transcriptional pro fi ling of rat hypothalamus response to 2 , 3 , 7 , 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-r-dioxin
In some mammals, halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon (HAH) exposure causes wasting syndrome, defined as significant weight loss associated with lethal outcomes. The most potent HAH in causing wasting is
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