Dinosaurs Dined on Grass

@article{Piperno2005DinosaursDO,
  title={Dinosaurs Dined on Grass},
  author={Dolores R. Piperno and Hans‐Dieter Sues},
  journal={Science},
  year={2005},
  volume={310},
  pages={1126 - 1128}
}
Grasses are among the most ecologically dominant flowering plants. Did the most dominant herbivores of the Mesozoic--the dinosaurs--evolve together with grasses? This question has been hard to answer, owing to the poor fossil record. In their Perspective, [Piperno and Sues][1] discuss results reported in the same issue by [ Prasad et al. ][2] in which phytoliths, the small silicate structures synthesized by many plants, found in coprolites (fossilized dinosaur dung) have been examined and… 
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While some scientists have been working to sequence and describe the human genome, with increasingly dramatic results, another set of scientists has been quietly providing a map of evolutionary
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