Dinosaurian growth patterns and rapid avian growth rates

@article{Erickson2001DinosaurianGP,
  title={Dinosaurian growth patterns and rapid avian growth rates},
  author={Gregory M. Erickson and Kristina A. Curry Rogers and Scott A. Yerby},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2001},
  volume={412},
  pages={429-433}
}
Did dinosaurs grow in a manner similar to extant reptiles, mammals or birds, or were they unique? Are rapid avian growth rates an innovation unique to birds, or were they inherited from dinosaurian precursors? We quantified growth rates for a group of dinosaurs spanning the phylogenetic and size diversity for the clade and used regression analysis to characterize the results. Here we show that dinosaurs exhibited sigmoidal growth curves similar to those of other vertebrates, but had unique… Expand
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