Dinosaur nest ecology and predation during the Late Cretaceous: was there a relationship between upper Cretaceous extinction and nesting behavior?

@article{Bois2017DinosaurNE,
  title={Dinosaur nest ecology and predation during the Late Cretaceous: was there a relationship between upper Cretaceous extinction and nesting behavior?},
  author={John P. Bois and Stephen J. Mullin},
  journal={Historical Biology},
  year={2017},
  volume={29},
  pages={976 - 986}
}
  • J. Bois, S. J. Mullin
  • Published 9 January 2017
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • Historical Biology
Abstract Many hypotheses have been advanced to explain the K/Pg extinctions, yet none closely examines the likely interactions between dinosaurs and contemporary taxa within their communities. The diversity of predators of dinosaur nests and hatchlings increased toward the end of the Cretaceous. In addition to large snakes having been found fossilized in the act of foraging in dinosaur nests, mammals and birds had also evolved new forms potentially capable of exploiting this resource. The… 

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