Dinosaur diversity and the rock record

@article{Barrett2009DinosaurDA,
  title={Dinosaur diversity and the rock record},
  author={Paul M. Barrett and Alistair J. Mcgowan and Victoria Page},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2009},
  volume={276},
  pages={2667 - 2674}
}
Palaeobiodiversity analysis underpins macroevolutionary investigations, allowing identification of mass extinctions and adaptive radiations. However, recent large-scale studies on marine invertebrates indicate that geological factors play a central role in moulding the shape of diversity curves and imply that many features of such curves represent sampling artefacts, rather than genuine evolutionary events. In order to test whether similar biases affect diversity estimates for terrestrial taxa… 

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