Diminished Responsibility and the Sutcliffe Case: Legal, Psychiatric and Social Aspects (A ‘Layman's' View)

@article{Prins1983DiminishedRA,
  title={Diminished Responsibility and the Sutcliffe Case: Legal, Psychiatric and Social Aspects (A ‘Layman's' View)},
  author={Herschel A. Prins},
  journal={Medicine, Science and the Law},
  year={1983},
  volume={23},
  pages={17 - 24}
}
  • H. Prins
  • Published 1983
  • Medicine
  • Medicine, Science and the Law
The issue of diminishment of responsibility is discussed by a ‘layman’ both generally and more specifically in relation to the Sutcliffe case. Legal, psychiatric and social aspects are considered in the context of the present constraints of the law as are some proposals for reform. 

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