Dimensional Analysis of Production and Utility Functions in Economics

@article{Kim2015DimensionalAO,
  title={Dimensional Analysis of Production and Utility Functions in Economics},
  author={Bryceson Kim},
  journal={Macroeconomics: Aggregative Models eJournal},
  year={2015}
}
  • Bryceson Kim
  • Published 6 January 2015
  • Economics
  • Macroeconomics: Aggregative Models eJournal
This paper explores dimensional analysis of production and utility functions in economics. As raised by Barnett, dimensional analysis is important in consistency checks of economics functions. However, unlike Barnett's dismissal of CES and Cobb-Douglas production functions, we will demonstrate that under constant return-to-scale and other assumptions, production function can indeed be justified dimensionally. And then we consider utility functions. 
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