Dilution of Fluon Before Trap Surface Treatment Has No Effect on Longhorned Beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Captures

@article{Allison2016DilutionOF,
  title={Dilution of Fluon Before Trap Surface Treatment Has No Effect on Longhorned Beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Captures},
  author={Jeremy D. Allison and Elizabeth E. Graham and Therese M. Poland and Brian L. Strom},
  journal={Journal of Economic Entomology},
  year={2016},
  volume={109},
  pages={1215 - 1219}
}
Abstract Several studies have observed that trap captures of longhorned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) can be increased by treating the surface of intercept traps with a lubricant. In addition to being expensive, these treatments can alter the spectral properties of intercept traps when applied neat. These surface treatments, particularly Fluon, are commonly used diluted as a low friction coating to prevent insects from climbing out of rearing containers. The purpose of this study was to… 
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