Digging deeper into East African human Y chromosome lineages

@article{Gomes2010DiggingDI,
  title={Digging deeper into East African human Y chromosome lineages},
  author={Ver{\'o}nica Gomes and Paula S{\'a}nchez-Diz and Ant{\'o}nio Amorim and {\'A}ngel Carracedo and Leonor Gusm{\~a}o},
  journal={Human Genetics},
  year={2010},
  volume={127},
  pages={603-613}
}
The most significant and widely studied remodeling of the African genetic landscape is the Bantu expansion, which led to an almost total replacement of the previous populations from the sub-Saharan region. [] Key Method Here, samples from a Ugandan Nilotic-speaking population were studied for 37 Y chromosome-specific SNPs, and the obtained data were compared with those already available for other sub-Saharan population groups. Although Uganda lies on the fringe of both Bantu and Nilotic expansions, a low…

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