Digging adaptation in insectivorous subterranean eutherians. The enigma of Mesoscalops montanensis unveiled by geometric morphometrics and finite element analysis

@article{Piras2015DiggingAI,
  title={Digging adaptation in insectivorous subterranean eutherians. The enigma of Mesoscalops montanensis unveiled by geometric morphometrics and finite element analysis},
  author={Paolo Piras and Gabriele Sansalone and Luciano Teresi and M. L.G. Moscato and Antonio Profico and R. Eng and Timothy C. Cox and Anna Loy and Paolo Colangelo and Tassos Kotsakis},
  journal={Journal of Morphology},
  year={2015},
  volume={276}
}
The enigmatic Early Miocene fossorial mammal Mesoscalops montanensis shows one of the most modified humeri among terrestrial mammals. It has been suggested, on qualitative considerations, that this species has no extant homologues for humerus kinematics and that, functionally, the closest extant group is represented by Chrysochloridae. We combine here three dimensional geometric morphometrics, finite element analysis and phylogenetic comparative methods to explore the shape and mechanical… 
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