Differing ecosystem responses of vegetation cover to extreme drought on the Big Sur coast of California

@article{Potter2018DifferingER,
  title={Differing ecosystem responses of vegetation cover to extreme drought on the Big Sur coast of California},
  author={Christopher Potter},
  journal={Journal of Applied Remote Sensing},
  year={2018},
  volume={12}
}
  • C. Potter
  • Published 25 June 2018
  • Environmental Science, Mathematics
  • Journal of Applied Remote Sensing
Abstract. Impacts of the extreme 2013 to 2014 drought on vegetation canopy cover in the Big Sur region of central coastal California were assessed using a combination of satellite image analysis and in situ measurements of soil moisture. Landsat and moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer satellite images were analyzed and compared across six ecosystems representative of the predominant vegetation types of the region at the U. S. Forest Service’s Brazil Ranch study site. Results showed… 

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