Differentiation of tundra/taiga and boreal coniferous forest wolves: genetics, coat colour and association with migratory caribou

@article{Musiani2007DifferentiationOT,
  title={Differentiation of tundra/taiga and boreal coniferous forest wolves: genetics, coat colour and association with migratory caribou},
  author={Marco Musiani and Jennifer A. Leonard and H. Dean Cluff and Cormack C. Gates and Stefano Mariani and Paul C Paquet and Carles Vil{\`a} and Robert K. Wayne},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2007},
  volume={16}
}
The grey wolf has one of the largest historic distributions of any terrestrial mammal and can disperse over great distances across imposing topographic barriers. As a result, geographical distance and physical obstacles to dispersal may not be consequential factors in the evolutionary divergence of wolf populations. However, recent studies suggest ecological features can constrain gene flow. We tested whether wolf–prey associations in uninterrupted tundra and forested regions of Canada… Expand
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