Differential sex-independent amygdala response to infant crying and laughing in parents versus nonparents

@article{Seifritz2003DifferentialSA,
  title={Differential sex-independent amygdala response to infant crying and laughing in parents versus nonparents},
  author={Erich Seifritz and Fabrizio Esposito and John G. Neuhoff and Andreas L{\"u}thi and Henrietta Mustovic and Gerhard Dammann and Ulrich von Bardeleben and Ernst-Wilhelm Radue and Sossio Cirillo and Gioacchino Tedeschi and Francesco Di Salle},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2003},
  volume={54},
  pages={1367-1375}
}
BACKGROUND Animal and human studies implicate forebrain neural circuits in maternal behavior. Here, we hypothesized that human brain response to emotional stimuli relevant for social interactions between infants and adults are modulated by sex- and experience-dependent factors. METHODS We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and examined brain response to infant crying and laughing in mothers and fathers of young children and in women and men without children. RESULTS Women but not… Expand
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