Differential oxidation of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in vivo in the rat.

@article{Leyton1987DifferentialOO,
  title={Differential oxidation of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in vivo in the rat.},
  author={J. Leyton and P. J. Drury and Michael Angus Crawford},
  journal={The British journal of nutrition},
  year={1987},
  volume={57 3},
  pages={
          383-93
        }
}
The oxidation rates of lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, alpha-linolenic, linoleic, kappa-linolenic, dihomo-gamma-linolenic and arachidonic acids were studied by use of a radioisotope tracer technique in weanling rats at rest in a metabolism chamber over 24 h. Of the saturated fatty acids, lauric acid (12:0) was the most efficient energy substrate: the longer the chain length of the saturated fatty acids, the slower the rate of oxidation. Oleic acid (18:1) was oxidized at a remarkably… Expand
In vivo oxidation of carboxyl-labelled cyclic fatty acids formed from linoleic and linolenic acids in the rat.
TLDR
The data clearly demonstrate that, at least for the first beta-oxidation cycle, CFAM are oxidised in a similar way as both essential fatty acids. Expand
Quantifying conversion of linoleic to arachidonic and other n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in unanesthetized rats
TLDR
The heavy-isotope intravenous infusion method could be used to quantify steady-state liver synthesis-secretion of AA from LA under different conditions in rodents and in humans. Expand
Metabolism of α-linolenic acid in humans
TLDR
Gender differences in 18:3n-3 metabolism in humans are reviewed, including fatty acid beta-oxidation, recycling of carbon by fatty acid synthesis de novo and conversion to longer-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Expand
Isomerization increases the postprandial oxidation of linoleic acid but not alpha-linolenic acid in men.
TLDR
It is shown that isomerization increases the postprandial oxidation of linoleic acid but not alpha-linolenic acid in men, and their major trans isomers in human volunteers. Expand
Conjugated linoleic acid isomers in mitochondria: evidence for an alteration of fatty acid oxidation.
TLDR
The CLA studied appeared to be both poorly oxidizable and capable of interfering with the oxidation of usual FA at a step close to the beginning of the beta-oxidative cycle. Expand
Conversion of α-linolenic acid to palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic and oleic acids in men and women
TLDR
The results suggest that the extent of partitioning towards beta-oxidation and carbon recycling may regulate the availability of 18:3n-3 for conversion to longer-chain fatty acids. Expand
Effect of Calcium Treatment on Catabolic Rates of 13C-Labeled Fatty Acids Bound to the α and β Positions of Triacylglycerol.
TLDR
Results indicate that in the presence of calcium, the saturated fatty acid bound to the β position is highly catabolized, whereas thatbound to the α position is not well catabolicized. Expand
Oxidative metabolism of [1-14C] mono-trans isomers of linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids in the rat.
Trans polyunsaturated fatty acids are formed during processing of vegetable oils such as deodorization and frying. The oxidative metabolism of linoleic and alpha-linolenic acids and of theirExpand
Pathway of alpha-linolenic acid through the mitochondrial outer membrane in the rat liver and influence on the rate of oxidation. Comparison with linoleic and oleic acids.
TLDR
The observations show that alpha-linolenoyl-CoA synthesized other than in the mitochondria cannot be used to any great extent by the mitochondia due to its configuration. Expand
Novel Pathway of Metabolism of α-Linolenic Acid in the Guinea Pig
TLDR
The metabolic fate of an oral dose of 14C-labeled ALA is explored in guinea pigs fed a defined diet for 3 wk from weaning to identify a new route of metabolism of ALA in this species, presumably through the sebaceous glands onto fur. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 20 REFERENCES
A comparison of the metabolism of elaidic, oleic, palmitic, and stearic acids in the rat.
  • R. H. Coots
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of lipid research
  • 1964
TLDR
The evidence is clear that the animal is capable of metabolizing trans fatty acids such as elaidic acid, and that the isomeric acids disappear from the tissues on cessation of their incorporation into the body tissues. Expand
Metabolism of 1-C14 Octanoic and 1-C14 Palmitic Acid by Rat Intestinal Slices.∗
TLDR
Analysis of the lipid soluble products by gas liquid chromatography demonstrated that a small but significant amount of the label from C14-octanoic acid was recovered in fatty acids with chain lengths of 10-20 carbon atoms, indicating that very little mucosal catabolism of palmitic acid had occurred. Expand
Conversion of first and sixth carbons of stearic acid to carbon dioxide by rats.
TLDR
It is postulated that, once the breakdown of palmitic acid is initiated in the intact animal, a palMITic acid molecule is disrupted in such a manner that all of its carbons are converted to COz at about the same time. Expand
Differences in the intestinal absorption of saturated and unsaturated long chain fatty acids.
TLDR
It is concluded that although intraluminal solubility of palmitate is less than that of linoleate, initial uptake of the two lipids by intestinal mucosa is similar, and significant differences in rates of entry into the cell and/or rate of microsomal metabolism result in a significantly less rapid reesterification and, therefore, overall absorption. Expand
Whole body oxidation of dietary fatty acids: implications for energy utilization.
Whole body oxidation of dietary stearic, oleic, and linoleic acid was measured in males consuming a test diet of normal foods at a level commensurate with energy requirements for 16 days. LabeledExpand
Intestinal lymph as pathway for transport of absorbed fatty acids of different chain lengths.
TLDR
The present investigation deals with the extent to which the even-carbon homologues from decanoic to my&tic acids and stearic acid can be recovered in intestinal lymph after their absorption. Expand
A fatty acyl-CoA oxidizing system in rat liver peroxisomes; enhancement by clofibrate, a hypolipidemic drug.
  • P. Lazarow, C. de Duve
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1976
TLDR
Purified rat liver peroxisomes contain a cyanide-insensitive fatty acyl-CoA oxidizing system that uses O2 and NAD as electron acceptors, and the activity of this system is increased approximately one order of magnitude in rats treated with clofibrate. Expand
A preliminary investigation into the oxygen-combining properties of pogonophore haemoglobin.
  • R. Wells, R. P. Dales
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Comparative biochemistry and physiology. A, Comparative physiology
  • 1976
Abstract 1. 1. 1. The respiratory pigment of the pogonophore Siboglinum ekmani has an extraordinarily high affinity for oxygen, the p50 being 0.085 mm Hg (11.3 N m−2) at pH 6.5 and 20°C. 2. 2. TheExpand
...
1
2
...