Differential necrophoric behaviour of the ant Solenopsis invicta towards fungal-infected corpses of workers and pupae

@article{Qiu2015DifferentialNB,
  title={Differential necrophoric behaviour of the ant Solenopsis invicta towards fungal-infected corpses of workers and pupae},
  author={Hua-long Qiu and L-H Lu and Q Shi and C. C. Tu and T. Lin and Y. He},
  journal={Bulletin of Entomological Research},
  year={2015},
  volume={105},
  pages={607 - 614}
}
Abstract Necrophoric behaviour is critical sanitation behaviour in social insects. However, little is known about the necrophoric responses of workers towards different developmental stages in a colony as well as its underlying mechanism. Here, we show that Solenopsis invicta workers display distinct necrophoric responses to corpses of workers and pupae. Corpses of workers killed by freezing (dead for <1 h) were carried to a refuse pile, but pupal corpses would take at least 1 day to elicit… Expand
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A death pheromone, oleic acid, triggers hygienic behavior in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.)
TLDR
A picture is painted of the molecular mechanism behind hygienic brood-removal behavior, using odorants associated with freeze-killed brood as a model, and it is suggested that the volatile β-ocimene flags hyGienic workers’ attention, while oleic acid is the death cue, triggering removal. Expand
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