Differential mobility in two small phyllostomid bats,Artibeus watsoni andMicronycteris microtis, in a fragmented neotropical landscape

@article{Albrecht2010DifferentialMI,
  title={Differential mobility in two small phyllostomid bats,Artibeus watsoni andMicronycteris microtis, in a fragmented neotropical landscape},
  author={Larissa Albrecht and Christoph F. J. Meyer and Elisabeth Klara Viktoria Kalko},
  journal={Acta Theriologica},
  year={2010},
  volume={52},
  pages={141-149}
}
To assess the influence of habitat fragmentation on small bats, we determined home range size and mobility of the frugivorousArtibeus watsoni Thomas, 1901 and the gleaning insectivorousMicronycteris microtis Miller, 1898 by radiotracking on different-sized islands (2.7–17 ha) in Lake Gatún, Panamá. The two species differed in their response to fragmentation. Home range size was highly variable in the five trackedA. watsoni, ranging from 1.8 to 17.9 ha with a mean of about 9 ha. Some individuals… Expand

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