Differential feeding success of two paralysis-inducing ticks, Rhipicephalus warburtoni and Ixodes rubicundus on sympatric small mammal species, Elephantulus myurus and Micaelamys namaquensis.

@article{Harrison2012DifferentialFS,
  title={Differential feeding success of two paralysis-inducing ticks, Rhipicephalus warburtoni and Ixodes rubicundus on sympatric small mammal species, Elephantulus myurus and Micaelamys namaquensis.},
  author={Alan T. Harrison and Gillian N. Robb and Nigel C Bennett and Ivan G. Horak},
  journal={Veterinary parasitology},
  year={2012},
  volume={188 3-4},
  pages={346-54}
}
Rodents are recognised as important hosts of ixodid ticks and as reservoirs of tick-borne pathogens across the world. Sympatric insectivores are usually inconspicuous and often overlooked as hosts of ticks and reservoirs of disease. Elephant shrews or sengis of the order Macroscelidea are small insectivores that often occur in sympatry with rodents in southern Africa. Sengis are invariably parasitised by large numbers of immature ticks while sympatric rodents are infested with very few. The… CONTINUE READING
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