Differential effect of race on the axial and appendicular skeletons of children.

@article{Gilsanz1998DifferentialEO,
  title={Differential effect of race on the axial and appendicular skeletons of children.},
  author={Vicente Gilsanz and David L. Skaggs and Arzu Kovanlikaya and James Sayre and M. L. Palacios Loro and Francine Ratner Kaufman and Stanley G. Korenman},
  journal={The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism},
  year={1998},
  volume={83 5},
  pages={1420-7}
}
The prevalence of osteoporosis and the incidence of fractures are substantially lower in black than in white subjects, a finding generally attributed to racial differences in adult bone mass. Whether these racial differences are present in childhood is the subject of considerable interest, as the amount of bone gained during growth is a major determinant of future susceptibility to fractures. We measured the density and size of the vertebrae and femurs of 80 black and 80 white healthy children… CONTINUE READING

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