Differential association with cellular substructures of pseudorabies virus DNA during early and late phases of replication.

Abstract

Pseudorabies virus DNA synthesis can be divided into two phases, early and late, which can be distinguished from each other on the basis of the structures of the replicating DNA. The two types of replicating virus DNA can also be distinguished from each other on the basis of the cellular substructures with which each is associated. Analysis by electron microscopic autoradiography showed that during the first round of replication, nascent virus DNA was found in the vicinity of the nuclear membrane; during later rounds of replication the nascent virus DNA was located centrally within the nucleus. The degree of association of virus DNA synthesized at early and late phases with the nuclear matrix fractions also differed; a larger proportion of late than of early nascent virus DNA was associated with this fraction. While nascent cellular DNA only was associated in significant amounts with the nuclear matrix fraction, a large part (up to 40%) of all the virus DNA remained associated with this fraction. However, no retention of specific virus proteins in this fraction was observed. Except for two virus proteins, which were preferentially extracted from the nuclear matrix, approximately 20% of all virus proteins remained in the nuclear matrix fraction. The large proportion of virus DNA associated with the nuclear fraction indicated that virus DNA may be intimately associated with some proteins. Indeed, protease-treated, "purified" DNA preparations contained two proteins (15K and 10K) with histone-like properties which were protected by the DNA from deproteinization, probably by virtue of being at the center of the concatemeric tangles of virus DNA. It is possible that these proteins play a role in anchoring virus DNA to the nuclear matrices.

Cite this paper

@article{BENPORAT1984DifferentialAW, title={Differential association with cellular substructures of pseudorabies virus DNA during early and late phases of replication.}, author={TAMAR BEN-PORAT and Ruth Ann Veach and Matthew Blankenship and Allan S. Kaplan}, journal={Virology}, year={1984}, volume={139 2}, pages={205-22} }