Differential amygdala responses to happy and fearful facial expressions depend on selective attention

@article{Williams2005DifferentialAR,
  title={Differential amygdala responses to happy and fearful facial expressions depend on selective attention},
  author={Mark A. Williams and Francis McGlone and David F. Abbott and Jason B. Mattingley},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2005},
  volume={24},
  pages={417-425}
}
Facial expressions of emotion elicit increased activity in the human amygdala. Such increases are particularly evident for expressions that convey potential threat to the observer, and arise even when the face is masked from awareness. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine whether the amygdala responds differentially to threatening (fearful) versus nonthreatening (happy) facial expressions depending on whether the face is attended or actively ignored. In separate runs… Expand
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