Differential activity of maternally and paternally derived chromosome regions in mice

@article{Cattanach1985DifferentialAO,
  title={Differential activity of maternally and paternally derived chromosome regions in mice},
  author={Bruce M. Cattanach and M Kirk},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1985},
  volume={315},
  pages={496-498}
}
Although both parental sexes contribute equivalent genetic information to the zygote, in mammals this information is not necessarily functionally equivalent. Diploid parthenotes possessing two maternal genomes are generally inviable1, embryos possessing two paternal genomes in man may form hydatidiform moles2, and nuclear transplantation experiments in mice have shown that both parental genomes are necessary for complete embryogenesis3–6. Not all of the genome is involved in these parental… 
Autosomal and X-chromosome imprinting.
Mouse genetic studies using Robertsonian and reciprocal translocations have shown that certain autosomal regions of loci are subject to a parental germ line imprint, which renders maternal and
Mouse embryos with paternal duplication of an imprinted chromosome 7 region die at midgestation and lack placental spongiotrophoblast.
TLDR
The simplest explanation for the PatDup.d7 phenotype is p-/p- expression of this gene, which is similar to that resulting from mutation of the imprinted distal chromosome 7 gene, Mash2, which in normal midgestation embryos exhibits spongiotrophoblast-specific maternally active/paternally inactive (m+/p-) allelic expression.
Parental origin effects in mice.
  • B. Cattanach
  • Biology, Medicine
    Journal of embryology and experimental morphology
  • 1986
TLDR
Findings provide some explanation for the observations that in mammals diploid parthenotes possessing two maternal genomes fail to survive and that, in man, embryos with two paternal chromosome sets are inviable, forming hydatidiform moles.
Influence of parental chromosomes on spatial specificity in androgenetic ↔ parthenogenetic chimaeras in the mouse
TLDR
It is demonstrated here that in post-implantation chimaeric fetuses, the expression of parental information results in spatial specificity so that parthenogenetic cells are confined to the embryo but the trophoblast consists almost entirely of androgenetic cells.
Genomic imprinting
TLDR
Genomic imprinting is a normal form of gene regulation that causes a subset of mammalian genes to be expressed from one of the two parental chromosomes, although aspects of the mechanism of imprinting may be the same in both organisms.
Genomic imprinting in fetal growth and development.
TLDR
Genomic imprinting involving the autosomes appears to be restricted to eutherian mammals, and has most likely evolved as a result of the conflicting concerns of the parental genomes in the growth and development of their offspring.
Genome imprinting phenomena on mouse chromosome 7.
TLDR
Examination of man-mouse homologies suggests that the loci for three pathological human conditions (Beckwith-Weidemann syndrome, dystrophia myotonia and rhabdomyosarcoma) with differential parental transmission may be located in homologous regions to those affected by imprinting phenomena on mouse chromosome 7.
A Genomic Imprinting Defect in Mice Traced to a Single Gene
TLDR
Examination of the causes of midgestation death of embryos with paternal duplication (PatDp) of distal chromosome 7 (dist7), a region replete with imprinted genes, shows that an Ascl2 transgene is able to promote the development of PatDp(dist7) embryos to term, providing strong evidence that AsCl2 is the only imprinted gene in the genome for which PatDP results in early embryonic death.
Interspecies approaches for the analysis of parental imprinting during mouse development.
TLDR
A relatively simple interspecies "mRNA phenotyping" approach applicable to the analysis of allele-specific expression as well as the identification of candidate imprinted genes is described.
Genomic imprinting: Male mice with uniparentally derived sex chromosomes
TLDR
To the knowledge, these are the first mammals produced that have a normal sex chromosome constitution but with both sex chromosomes derived from one parent, and evidence from other sources suggests that the X chromosome is parentally imprinted.
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TLDR
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TLDR
Using the first appearance of embryonically specified α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase and α-GPDH isozymes as markers during the ontogeny of interspecific hybrid trout, preferential activation of the paternally derived alleles is observed, which seems to contradict the model of gene activation outlined here.
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  • Biology, Medicine
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TLDR
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TLDR
It is reported here that the eggs which receive a male pronucleus develop to term but those with two female pronuclei develop only poorly after implantation, suggesting that the cytoplasm of activated eggs is fully competent to support development toterm but not if the genome is entirely of maternal origin.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
An efficient nuclear transfer technique is used in which a complete karyoplast, comprised of pronuclei, surrounding cytoplasm and a portion of the egg plasma membrane, is transferred utilizing Sendai virus membrane fusion to investigate whether sperm-related modifications to the egg cy toplasm are important.
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