Differential Y‐chromosome Anatolian Influences on the Greek and Cretan Neolithic

@article{King2008DifferentialYA,
  title={Differential Y‐chromosome Anatolian Influences on the Greek and Cretan Neolithic},
  author={R. King and S. {\"O}zcan and T. Carter and E. Kalfoglu and S. Atasoy and C. Triantaphyllidis and A. Kouvatsi and A. A. Lin and C‐E. T. Chow and L. Zhivotovsky and M. Michalodimitrakis and P. Underhill},
  journal={Annals of Human Genetics},
  year={2008},
  volume={72}
}
The earliest Neolithic sites of Europe are located in Crete and mainland Greece. A debate persists concerning whether these farmers originated in neighboring Anatolia and the role of maritime colonization. To address these issues 171 samples were collected from areas near three known early Neolithic settlements in Greece together with 193 samples from Crete. An analysis of Y‐chromosome haplogroups determined that the samples from the Greek Neolithic sites showed strong affinity to Balkan data… Expand

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