Differential Y‐chromosome Anatolian Influences on the Greek and Cretan Neolithic

@article{King2008DifferentialYA,
  title={Differential Y‐chromosome Anatolian Influences on the Greek and Cretan Neolithic},
  author={Roy J. King and Serhat {\"O}zcan and T. Carter and Ersi Abaci Kalfoglu and Sevil Atasoy and Costas D. Triantaphyllidis and Anastasia Kouvatsi and Alice A. Lin and C‐E. T. Chow and Lev A. Zhivotovsky and Manolis Michalodimitrakis and Peter A. Underhill},
  journal={Annals of Human Genetics},
  year={2008},
  volume={72}
}
The earliest Neolithic sites of Europe are located in Crete and mainland Greece. A debate persists concerning whether these farmers originated in neighboring Anatolia and the role of maritime colonization. To address these issues 171 samples were collected from areas near three known early Neolithic settlements in Greece together with 193 samples from Crete. An analysis of Y‐chromosome haplogroups determined that the samples from the Greek Neolithic sites showed strong affinity to Balkan data… 
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