Differential Adhesion and Infection of Nematodes by the Endoparasitic Fungus Meria coniospora (Deuteromycetes)

@article{Jansson1985DifferentialAA,
  title={Differential Adhesion and Infection of Nematodes by the Endoparasitic Fungus Meria coniospora (Deuteromycetes)},
  author={H. B. Jansson and Ayyamperumal Jeyaprakash and Bert Merton Zuckerman},
  journal={Applied and Environmental Microbiology},
  year={1985},
  volume={49},
  pages={552 - 555}
}
The conidia of the endoparasitic fungus Meria coniospora (Deuteromycetes) had different patterns of adhesion to the cuticles of the several nematode species tested; adhesion in some species was only to the head and tail regions, on others over the entire cuticle, whereas on others there was a complete lack of adhesion. After adhesion, the fungus usually infected the nematode. However, adhesion to third-stage larvae of five animal parasitic nematodes, all of which carry the cast cuticle from the… 
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~ ~~~~ Conidia of the endoparasitic nematophagous fungus Drechmeria coniospora adhere to the sensory organs of many nematode species. In some cases the adhesion phase is followed by penetration of
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Investigation of the pathogenicity and secondary metabolites of the endoparasitic fungus D. coniospora indicated that D.coniospora could infect nematodes by spores and produce active metabolites to kill nematode.
Role of the Second-Stage Cuticle of Entomogenous Nematodes in Preventing Infection by Nematophagous Fungi
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Third-stage infective juveniles (dauers) in the nematode genera Steinernema and Heterorhabditis are ensheathed in their second-stage (J2) cuticles, determined after the dauers moved through 5 cm of sand.
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TLDR
Conidia of the endoparasitic fungus Meria coniospora infected the bacterial-feeding nematode Panagrellus redivivus at specific sites, namely the mouth region and in male nematodes also in the tail, indicating the importance of sialic acids in the infection process.
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TLDR
The results show the importance of sialic acids in nematode chemotaxis and also in adhesion of conidia of M. coniospora, suggesting a link between attraction and adhesion in this system.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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