Different patterns of behavioral variation across and within species of spiders with differing degrees of urbanization

@article{KraljFier2017DifferentPO,
  title={Different patterns of behavioral variation across and within species of spiders with differing degrees of urbanization},
  author={Simona Kralj-Fi{\vs}er and Eileen A Hebets and Matja{\vz} Kuntner},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2017},
  volume={71},
  pages={1-15}
}
Behavioral characteristics importantly shape an animals’ ability to adapt to changing conditions. The notion that behavioral flexibility facilitates exploitation of urban environments has received mixed support, but recent studies propose that between-individual differences are important. We leverage existing knowledge on three species of orb-web spider (Araneidae, Araneae) whose abundances differ along an urban–rural gradient to test predictions about between- and within-species/individual… Expand

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