Different modes of assisted ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure

@article{Chiumello2002DifferentMO,
  title={Different modes of assisted ventilation in patients with acute respiratory failure},
  author={Davide Alberto Chiumello and Paolo Pelosi and E. Calvi and Luca M. Bigatello and Luciano Gattinoni},
  journal={European Respiratory Journal},
  year={2002},
  volume={20},
  pages={925 - 933}
}
The aim of the present study was to verify that the patient/ventilator interaction is similar, regardless of the mode of assisted mechanical ventilation (i.e. pressure- or volume-limited) used, if tidal volume (VT) and peak inspiratory flow (PIF) are matched. Therefore, the authors compared the effects of three different modes of assisted ventilation on the work of breathing (WOB) and gas exchange in patients with acute respiratory failure. For Protocol 1, in seven patients, the authors… 
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