Different fusiform activity to stranger and personally familiar faces in shy and social adults

@article{Beaton2009DifferentFA,
  title={Different fusiform activity to stranger and personally familiar faces in shy and social adults},
  author={Elliott A Beaton and Louis A. Schmidt and Jay Schulkin and Martin M. Antony and Richard P. Swinson and Geoffrey B. C. Hall},
  journal={Social Neuroscience},
  year={2009},
  volume={4},
  pages={308 - 316}
}
Abstract Although shyness is associated with deficits in different aspects of face processing including face recognition and facial emotions, we know relatively little about the neural correlates of face processing among individuals who are shy. Here we show reduced activation to stranger faces among shy adults in a key brain area involved in face processing. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired on 12 shy and 12 social young adults during the rapid… Expand
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