Different Approaches for Constraining Global Climate Models of the Anthropogenic Indirect Aerosol Effect

Abstract

A erosol particles resulting from human activity such as sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols have substantially increased the global mean aerosol burden since preindustrial times. Aerosol particles can affect the climate system via several mechanisms. The most prominent impacts are 1) the reflection of solar radiation back to space (a "direct" effect), 2) the absorption of solar radiation by soot and mineral dust to warm the atmospheric aerosol layer, which could hinder cloud formation and/or cause cloud droplets to evaporate (a "semi-direct" effect), and 3) the capability to act as condensation nuclei for (water and ice) clouds {"indirect effects"). The last effect, which is expected to increase the solar reflection of (water) clouds, is often distinguished into a

Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Feichter2007DifferentAF, title={Different Approaches for Constraining Global Climate Models of the Anthropogenic Indirect Aerosol Effect}, author={Johann Feichter}, year={2007} }