Differences in visible light‐induced pigmentation according to wavelengths: a clinical and histological study in comparison with UVB exposure

@article{Duteil2014DifferencesIV,
  title={Differences in visible light‐induced pigmentation according to wavelengths: a clinical and histological study in comparison with UVB exposure},
  author={Luc Duteil and Nathalie Cardot-Leccia and Catherine Queille-Roussel and Yves Maubert and Yona Harmelin and F{\'e}riel Boukari and Damien Ambrosetti and J P Lacour and Thierry Passeron},
  journal={Pigment Cell \& Melanoma Research},
  year={2014},
  volume={27}
}
The visible light spectrum is wide, and it can be hypothesized that all the wavelengths between 400-700 nm do not induce the same photobiological effects on pigmentation. [...] Key Method We made colorimetric, clinical, and histological assessments with increasing doses of those lights on healthy volunteers. Then, we compared these irradiations to non-exposed and UVB-exposed skin. Colorimetric and clinical assessments showed a clear dose effect with the 415-nm irradiation, in both skin type III and IV subjects…Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
Visible light is known to induce pigmentation in darker skin types. The investigators aim to study the effects of visible light on the skin after topical application of sunscreen plus… Expand
ConditionsPigmentation
InterventionOther
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