Difference in the level of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxin accumulation between the crabs Telmessus acutidens and Charybdis japonica collected in Onahama, Fukushima Prefecture

@article{Oikawa2009DifferenceIT,
  title={Difference in the level of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxin accumulation between the crabs Telmessus acutidens and Charybdis japonica collected in Onahama, Fukushima Prefecture},
  author={H. Oikawa and T. Fujita and K. Saito and M. Satomi and Y. Yano},
  journal={Fisheries Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={73},
  pages={395-403}
}
The difference in paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxin accumulation in the crabs Telmessus acutidens and Charybdis japonica was investigated at Onahama, Fukushima Prefecture, from 2002 to 2005. The level of toxin accumulation in the hepatopancreas of T. acutidens corresponded to that of mussels when examined on a yearly basis. In 2003, some crabs had a high toxicity of approximately 1000 MU, which compares to one-third of the human minimum lethal dose. Therefore T. acutidens should be… Expand

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