Dietary trans fatty acids: Review of recent human studies and food industry responses

@article{Hunter2006DietaryTF,
  title={Dietary trans fatty acids: Review of recent human studies and food industry responses},
  author={J. Edward Hunter},
  journal={Lipids},
  year={2006},
  volume={41},
  pages={967-992}
}
  • J. E. Hunter
  • Published 1 November 2006
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Lipids
Dietary trans FA at sufficiently high levels have been found to increase low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol and decrease high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (and thus to increase the ratio of LDL-cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol) compared with diets high in cis monounsaturated FA or PUFA. The dietary levels of trans FA at which these effects are easily measured are around 4% of energy or higher to increase LDL-cholesterol and around 5 to 6% of energy or higher to decrease HDL… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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The replacement of TFA with STA compared with other saturated fatty acids in foods that require solid fats beneficially affects LDL cholesterol, the primary target for CVD risk reduction; unsaturated fats are preferred for liquid fat applications. Expand
Cardiovascular disease risk of dietary stearic acid compared with trans , other saturated , and unsaturated fatty acids : a systematic review 1 – 4
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Supplementation with trans fatty acid at 1% energy did not increase serum cholesterol irrespective of the obesity-related genotypes in healthy adult Japanese.
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