Corpus ID: 30273334

Dietary supplements for osteoarthritis.

@article{Gregory2008DietarySF,
  title={Dietary supplements for osteoarthritis.},
  author={Philip J. Gregory and Morgan L. Sperry and Amy Friedman Wilson},
  journal={American family physician},
  year={2008},
  volume={77 2},
  pages={
          177-84
        }
}
A large number of dietary supplements are promoted to patients with osteoarthritis and as many as one third of those patients have used a supplement to treat their condition. Glucosamine-containing supplements are among the most commonly used products for osteoarthritis. Although the evidence is not entirely consistent, most research suggests that glucosamine sulfate can improve symptoms of pain related to osteoarthritis, as well as slow disease progression in patients with osteoarthritis of… Expand
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TLDR
Long-term treatment with glucosamine sulfate retarded the progression of knee osteoarthritis, possibly determining disease modification. Expand
Efficacy of methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) in osteoarthritis pain of the knee: a pilot clinical trial.
TLDR
The benefits and safety of MSM in managing OA and long-term use cannot be confirmed from this pilot trial, but its potential clinical application is examined. Expand
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TLDR
A systematic review and meta-analysis of all available randomized, controlled trials to determine the effects of chondroitin on pain and joint space width and to explore whether reported beneficial effects could be explained by biases affecting individual trials or publication bias. Expand
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TLDR
Evaluation of benefit of glucosamine and chondroitin preparations for OA symptoms using meta-analysis combined with systematic quality assessment of clinical trials of these preparations in knee and/or hip OA suggests some degree of efficacy appears probable for these preparations. Expand
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TLDR
A statistically significant effect of ginger extract could only be demonstrated by explorative statistical methods in the first period of treatment before cross-over, while a significant difference was not observed in the study as a whole. Expand
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TLDR
The results are not uniformly positive, and the reasons for this remain unexplained, but glucosamine was superior to placebo in the treatment of pain and functional impairment resulting from symptomatic OA. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Long-term effects of glucosamine sulphate on osteoarthritis progression: a randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trial
TLDR
The long-term combined structure- modifying and symptom-modifying effects of gluosamine sulphate suggest that it could be a disease modifying agent in osteoarthritis. Expand
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