Dietary pesticides (99.99% all natural).

@article{Ames1990DietaryP,
  title={Dietary pesticides (99.99\% all natural).},
  author={Bruce N. Ames and Margie Profet and Lois Swirsky Gold},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1990},
  volume={87},
  pages={7777 - 7781}
}
  • B. Ames, M. Profet, L. Gold
  • Published 1 October 1990
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
The toxicological significance of exposures to synthetic chemicals is examined in the context of exposures to naturally occurring chemicals. We calculate that 99.99% (by weight) of the pesticides in the American diet are chemicals that plants produce to defend themselves. Only 52 natural pesticides have been tested in high-dose animal cancer tests, and about half (27) are rodent carcinogens; these 27 are shown to be present in many common foods. We conclude that natural and synthetic chemicals… 

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