Dietary patterns and diabetes incidence in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.

@article{Hodge2007DietaryPA,
  title={Dietary patterns and diabetes incidence in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.},
  author={Allison M. Hodge and Dallas R. English and Kerin O'dea and Graham G. Giles},
  journal={American journal of epidemiology},
  year={2007},
  volume={165 6},
  pages={
          603-10
        }
}
The authors investigated the association of dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes in a 4-year prospective study of 36,787 adults in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study (1990-1994). A total of 31,641 (86%) participants completed follow-up, and 365 cases were identified. Four factors with eigenvalues of greater than 2 were identified using the principal factor method with 124 foods/beverages, followed by orthogonal rotation. Variables with factor loadings having absolute values of 0.3 or… 

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