Dietary meat, endogenous nitrosation and colorectal cancer.

@article{Kuhnle2007DietaryME,
  title={Dietary meat, endogenous nitrosation and colorectal cancer.},
  author={Gunter G C Kuhnle and Sheila Anne Bingham},
  journal={Biochemical Society transactions},
  year={2007},
  volume={35 Pt 5},
  pages={
          1355-7
        }
}
Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in developed countries such as the U.K., but incidence rates around the world vary approx. 20-fold. Diet is thought to be a key factor determining risk: red and processed meat, but not white meat or fish, are associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. The endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds is a possible explanation because red and processed meat, but not white meat or fish, cause a dose-dependent increase in faecal ATNCs… 
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