Dietary intake of vitamins A, C, and E and the risk of colorectal adenoma: a meta-analysis of observational studies

@article{Xu2013DietaryIO,
  title={Dietary intake of vitamins A, C, and E and the risk of colorectal adenoma: a meta-analysis of observational studies},
  author={Xiao-dong Xu and Enda Yu and Lian-jie Liu and W. Zhang and Xubiao Wei and Xianhua Gao and Ning Song and C. Fu},
  journal={European Journal of Cancer Prevention},
  year={2013},
  volume={22},
  pages={529–539}
}
To comprehensively summarize the association between dietary intake of vitamins A, C, and E and the risk of colorectal adenoma (CRA), the precursor of colorectal cancer, relevant studies were identified in MEDLINE and EMBASE up to 31 October 2012. Summary relative risks (SRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled with a random-effects model. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran’s Q and I2 statistics. A total of 13 studies with 3832 CRA cases were included in this… Expand
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