Corpus ID: 19392101

Dietary flavonoid intake and colorectal cancer risk: evidence from human population studies.

@article{Koci2013DietaryFI,
  title={Dietary flavonoid intake and colorectal cancer risk: evidence from human population studies.},
  author={B. Koci{\'c} and D. Kiti{\'c} and S. Brankovi{\'c}},
  journal={Journal of B.U.ON. : official journal of the Balkan Union of Oncology},
  year={2013},
  volume={18 1},
  pages={
          34-43
        }
}
Flavonoids are biologically active polyphenolic compounds widely distributed in plants. More than 5000 individual flavonoids have been identified, which are classified into at least 10 subgroups according to their chemical structure. Flavonoids of 6 principal subgroups- flavonols, flavones, anthocyanidins, catechins, flavanones, and isoflavones- are relatively common in human diets. Flavonoids are a large and diverse group of phytochemicals and research into their anti-carcinogenic potential… Expand

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TLDR
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It is concluded that flavonols, specifically quercetin, obtained from non-tea components of the diet may be linked with reduced risk of developing colon cancer. Expand
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The significant dose-dependent reductions in colorectal cancer risk that were associated with increased consumption of flavonols, quercetin, catechin, and epicatechin remained robust after controlling for overall fruit and vegetable consumption or for other flavonoid intake. Expand
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