Dietary fat guidelines have no evidence base: where next for public health nutritional advice?

@article{Harcombe2016DietaryFG,
  title={Dietary fat guidelines have no evidence base: where next for public health nutritional advice?},
  author={Zo{\"e} Harcombe},
  journal={British Journal of Sports Medicine},
  year={2016},
  volume={51},
  pages={769 - 774}
}
  • Z. Harcombe
  • Published 18 October 2016
  • Medicine
  • British Journal of Sports Medicine
Introduction National dietary guidelines were introduced in 1977 and 1983, by the US and UK governments, with the aim of reducing coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality. [] Key Method This narrative review examines all evidence collated. Results The RCT and PC evidence available to the dietary committees did not support the introduction of the dietary fat guidelines. The RCT and PC evidence currently available does not support the extant recommendations. Furthermore, the quality of the evidence is so poor…

US dietary guidelines: is saturated fat a nutrient of concern?

  • Z. Harcombe
  • Medicine
    British Journal of Sports Medicine
  • 2018
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Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Risk. Evidence, Lack of Evidence, and Diligence

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Effects of carbohydrate-restricted diets on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in overweight and obese adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Large randomized controlled trials of at least 6 months duration with carbohydrate restriction appear superior in improving lipid markers when compared with low-fat diets, and Dietary guidelines should consider carbohydrate restriction as an alternative dietary strategy for the prevention/management of dyslipidemia for populations with cardiometabolic risk.

The Health Benefits of Dietary Fibre

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In Korean adults, total fat, SFA and other fatty acids have been increasing along with the prevalence of hypercholesterolaemia, and this information can help set adequate macronutrient and fatty acid distribution ranges in developing population-specific preventive strategies against diet-related illness.

References

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Evidence from randomised controlled trials does not support current dietary fat guidelines: a systematic review and meta-analysis

RCT evidence currently available does not support the current dietary fat guidelines, and the evidence per se lacks generalisability for population-wide guidelines.

Evidence from prospective cohort studies does not support current dietary fat guidelines: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Empirical evidence to date found no significant difference in CHD mortality and total fat or saturated fat intake and thus does not support the present dietary fat guidelines, and the evidence per se lacks generalisability for population-wide guidelines.

Evidence from prospective cohort studies did not support the introduction of dietary fat guidelines in 1977 and 1983: a systematic review

A systematic review of prospective cohort studies, published prior to 1983, which examined the relationship between dietary fat, serum cholesterol and the development of CHD found no support for the recommendations to restrict dietary fat.

Evidence from randomised controlled trials did not support the introduction of dietary fat guidelines in 1977 and 1983: a systematic review and meta-analysis

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There was some evidence that reducing saturated fats reduced the risk of myocardial infarction, but effects on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular morbidity were less clear, and there were suggestions of greater protection with greater saturated fat reduction or greater increase in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats.
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