Dietary Supplements and Team-Sport Performance

@article{Bishop2010DietarySA,
  title={Dietary Supplements and Team-Sport Performance},
  author={David J. Bishop},
  journal={Sports Medicine},
  year={2010},
  volume={40},
  pages={995-1017}
}
  • D. Bishop
  • Published 1 December 2010
  • Medicine
  • Sports Medicine
A well designed diet is the foundation upon which optimal training and performance can be developed. However, as long as competitive sports have existed, athletes have attempted to improve their performance by ingesting a variety of substances. This practice has given rise to a multi-billion-dollar industry that aggressively markets its products as performance enhancing, often without objective, scientific evidence to support such claims. While a number of excellent reviews have evaluated the… Expand
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