Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D

@article{Ross2016DietaryRI,
  title={Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D},
  author={A Catharine Ross and Christine L. Taylor and Ann L Yaktine and Heather B Del Valle},
  journal={Pediatric Clinical Practice Guidelines \& Policies},
  year={2016}
}
Calcium and vitamin D are two essential nutrients long known for their role in bone health. Over the last ten years, the public has heard conflicting messages about other benefits of these nutrients—especially vitamin D—and also about how much calcium and vitamin D they need to be healthy. To help clarify this issue, the U. S. and Canadian governments asked the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to assess the current data on health outcomes associated with calcium and vitamin D. The IOM tasked a… 

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