Dietary Approaches to Prevent and Treat Hypertension: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association

@article{Appel2006DietaryAT,
  title={Dietary Approaches to Prevent and Treat Hypertension: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association},
  author={Lawrence J. Appel and Michael W. Brands and Stephen R. Daniels and Njeri Karanja and Patricia J. Elmer and Frank M. Sacks},
  journal={Hypertension},
  year={2006},
  volume={47},
  pages={296-308}
}
A substantial body of evidence strongly supports the concept that multiple dietary factors affect blood pressure (BP). Well-established dietary modifications that lower BP are reduced salt intake, weight loss, and moderation of alcohol consumption (among those who drink). Over the past decade, increased potassium intake and consumption of dietary patterns based on the “DASH diet” have emerged as effective strategies that also lower BP. Of substantial public health relevance are findings related… 

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ASH position paper: dietary approaches to lower blood pressure.

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TLDR
A substantial body of evidence has implicated several aspects of diet in the pathogenesis of elevated blood pressure, and African Americans are especially sensitive to the BP‐raising effects of excess salt intake, insufficient potassium intake, and suboptimal diet.

Dietary sodium, potassium, and alcohol: key players in the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of human hypertension.

TLDR
The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of currently available scientific evidence in the constantly evolving field of diet and HTN, placing particular emphasis on the key role of dietary sodium, dietary potassium, and alcohol intake in the pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of human hypertension.

Dietary Approaches to Prevent Hypertension

TLDR
Elevated blood pressure arises from a combination of environmental and genetic factors and the interactions of these factors and efforts that focus on environmental and individual behavioral changes that encourage and promote healthier food choices are warranted.

Role of diet in hypertension management

TLDR
Patients must be aware that dietary changes made within a concerted alteration in lifestyle can have a very significant impact on their blood pressure, and salt intake remains the most amenable to change.

The Role of Dietary Electrolytes and Childhood Blood Pressure Regulation

TLDR
The nutritional electrolyte-related determinants of blood pressure in children and adolescents are summarized, specifically the roles of dietary sodium and potassium in regulating casual BP, BP reactivity, and circadian BP patterns in youth are summarized.

The Role of Diets in Prevention and Hypertension Therapy

TLDR
Modification of food intake patterns referred to is to follow the general guidelines for balanced nutrition also in accordance with the dietary approach to stop hypertension (DASH), which is high in vegetables and fruit, high-fiber foods, low-fat milk, meat, and nuts.

Dietary Approaches to Hypertension: Dietary Sodium and the DASH Diet for Cardiovascular Health

The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) trial demonstrated that an eating plan rich in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy products with reduced total and saturated fat, cholesterol, and
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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