Dietary Antioxidants, Cognitive Function and Dementia - A Systematic Review

@article{Crichton2013DietaryAC,
  title={Dietary Antioxidants, Cognitive Function and Dementia - A Systematic Review},
  author={Georgina E Crichton and Janet Bryan and Karen J Murphy},
  journal={Plant Foods for Human Nutrition},
  year={2013},
  volume={68},
  pages={279-292}
}
Antioxidant compounds, contained in fruit, vegetables and tea, have been postulated to have a protective effect against age-related cognitive decline by combating oxidative stress. However, recent research on this subject has been conflicting. The aim of this systematic review was to consider current epidemiological and longitudinal evidence for an association between habitual dietary intake of antioxidants and cognition, with consideration given to both cognitive functioning and risk for… Expand
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