Diet for a small primate: Insectivory and gummivory in the (large) patas monkey (Erythrocebus patas pyrrhonotus)

@article{Isbell1998DietFA,
  title={Diet for a small primate: Insectivory and gummivory in the (large) patas monkey (Erythrocebus patas pyrrhonotus)},
  author={Lynne A. Isbell},
  journal={American Journal of Primatology},
  year={1998},
  volume={45}
}
  • L. Isbell
  • Published 1998
  • Biology
  • American Journal of Primatology
A 17 month field study of unprovisioned patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas pyrrhonotus) in Laikipia, Kenya, using both ad libitum and scan sampling techniques, revealed that the diet of patas monkeys consists primarily of gum of Acacia drepanolobium, arthropods (both free‐living and concentrated in the swollen thorns of A. Drepanolobium), and other animals. This type of diet is normally found only in smaller‐bodied primates. Results from vegetational transects suggest that the larger‐bodied… 

Nutritional benefits of Crematogaster mimosae ants and Acacia drepanolobium gum for patas monkeys and vervets in Laikipia, Kenya.

Patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) are midsized primates that feed extensively on the gum of Acacia drepanolobium and the ants are housed in swollen thorns of this Acacia. Their diet resembles that

Ecology, behaviour and threats of Patas monkey (Erythrocebus patas, Schreber, 1775): A Review paper

The Patas Monkey (Erythrocebus patas), is a ground-dwelling medium sized primate distributed from West to Eastern Africa that exhibits an apparent feature of sexual dimorphism and adaptation to a wide range of ecological conditions is also common.

Differential habitat utilization by patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) and tantalus monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops tantalus) living sympatrically in northern Cameroon

  • N. Nakagawa
  • Environmental Science
    American journal of primatology
  • 1999
It is suggested, however, that high locomotive ability enabled patas to effectively utilize small and widely dispersed items of food such as grasshoppers and to explore areas with high availability of food and water and with preferable sleeping sites.

Interspecific and temporal variation of ant species within Acacia drepanolobium ant domatia, a staple food of patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) in Laikipia, Kenya

It is suggested that greater consideration be given to species differences in animal food choices and that further studies be conducted to examine the degree to which ants influence energy intake and reproduction in other primates.

Foraging energetics in patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) and tantalus monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops tantalus): Implications for reproductive seasonality

The patas monkeys’ birth season appears to be timed to the season when the monkeys can obtain more surplus energy and protein, supported by the patas’ high locomotive ability, which may enable them to obtain more energy from seeds of Acacia seyal and gums of A. sieberiana.

Movements of vervets (Cercopithecus aethiops) and patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) as estimators of food resource size, density, and distribution

Compared to patas, vervets travelled shorter distances, moved shorter distances between food sites, stopped less often, and had longer feeding bouts, suggesting that foods of verveTS are denser and larger, overall, than foods of patas.

Locomotor Anatomy and Behavior of Patas Monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) with Comparison to Vervet Monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops)

A comparative study based on dissection of skin, muscle, and bone from complete individuals of patas and vervet monkeys reveals that small adjustments in patas skeletal proportions, relative mass of limbs and tail, and specific muscle groups promote efficient sagittal limb motion.

Locomotor activity differences between sympatric patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) and vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops): implications for the evolution of long hindlimb length in Homo.

Comparing the locomotor activities of patas monkeys and sympatric, closely related vervet monkeys provides evidence for the hypothesis that patas use their long stride more to increase foraging efficiency while walking than to run, either from predators or otherwise.

Seasonal, sex, and interspecific differences in activity time budgets and diets of patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) and tantalus monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops tantalus), living sympatrically in northern Cameroon

Seasonal, sex, and interspecific differences in activity time budgest and diets of patas and sympatric tantalus monkeys are examined on the basis of 5-day data sets collected in three and two different seasons by the method of focal animal sampling.

Macronutrient and Energy Contributions of Insects to the Diet of a Frugivorous Monkey (Cercopithecus ascanius)

It is demonstrated that female redtail monkeys gain more nutrients than expected given that they spend <10 % of feeding time ingesting insects, and the many primates that complement plant diet items with insects may gain substantial nutrition through minimal feeding time.
...

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Movements of vervets (Cercopithecus aethiops) and patas monkeys (Erythrocebus patas) as estimators of food resource size, density, and distribution

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