Diet and haemostasis: time for nutrition science to get more involved.

@article{Vorster1997DietAH,
  title={Diet and haemostasis: time for nutrition science to get more involved.},
  author={H. Vorster and J. Cummings and F. Veldman},
  journal={The British journal of nutrition},
  year={1997},
  volume={77 5},
  pages={
          671-84
        }
}
Abnormal haemostasis, and specifically a pre-thrombotic state characterized by hypercoagulability, increased platelet aggregation and impaired fibrinolysis, is associated with increased atheroma and thrombosis. The recent literature clearly indicates that diet may prevent or be used to treat some abnormal haemostatic states. There are reports on effects of energy intake and expenditure, alcohol consumption, intakes of total fat, different fatty acids, fish oil, NSP and vitamins on markers of… Expand
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