Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations Revision 2006: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Nutrition Committee

@article{Lichtenstein2006DietAL,
  title={Diet and Lifestyle Recommendations Revision 2006: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association Nutrition Committee},
  author={Alice H. Lichtenstein and Lawrence J. Appel and Michael W. Brands and Mercedes R. Carnethon and Stephen R Daniels and Harold A. Franch and Barry A. Franklin and Penny M. Kris-Etherton and William S. Harris and Barbara V Howard and Njeri Karanja and Michael Lefevre and Lawrence L. Rudel and Frank M. Sacks and Linda V Van Horn and Mary Winston and Judith Wylie-Rosett},
  journal={Circulation},
  year={2006},
  volume={114},
  pages={82-96}
}
Improving diet and lifestyle is a critical component of the American Heart Association’s strategy for cardiovascular disease risk reduction in the general population. This document presents recommendations designed to meet this objective. Specific goals are to consume an overall healthy diet; aim for a healthy body weight; aim for recommended levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides; aim for normal blood pressure; aim for a normal… Expand
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